Tag Archives: James Buster Clarkson

Negro League Baseball and HBCUs

I watched the film documentary “Tell Them We Are Rising” on my local Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) station February 19th.  It detailed the history of Historically Black College and Universities (HBCUs) beginning from after the Civil War.  They had an undeniable and immeasurable impact on the education of African-Americans during times when the doors of white institutions of higher academic achievement were mainly closed to people of color.  From the end of the Civil War to over halfway through the 20th Century, the vast majority of African-American doctors, lawyers, nurses, teachers, accountants, and others in professional occupations were educated at HBCUs.  A number of players in Negro League baseball also attended HBCUs.

Based on information currently established, an estimated 40% of Negro League baseball players were college educated.  The majority, other than a few exceptions, were products of  HBCUs.  Six (6) are listed below:

Frank “Doc” Sykes   –   Morehouse College/Howard Medical

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While still in medical school, Sykes started his Negro League baseball career pitching for the New York Lincoln Giants in 1914.  Between 1914 and 1919, the 6’2” right handed hurler also played with the New York Lincoln Stars, Brooklyn Royal Giants, Philadelphia Giants, and the Hilldale Club of Darby, Pa.  His longest tenure, 1920 – 1926, came with the Baltimore Black Sox.  After the 1926 season, Sykes retired from baseball became a dentist in his hometown of Decatur, Alabama.

 

Grady “Dip” Orange   –   Wiley College

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Called “Dip”, short for diploma, Orange began his Negro League baseball career in 1925 with the Birmingham Black Barons.  He had the talent and versatility to play any infield position. After the Black Barons, his career included stints with the Kansas City Monarchs (1926 – 1927, 1931), the Cleveland Tigers (1928), and the Detroit Stars (1929 – 1931).  Orange graduated from Meharry Medical College after his baseball career ended.

 

Jimmie Crutchfield   –   Lincoln University (MO.)

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A 5’7”speedy center fielder, Crutchfield played in the Negro Leagues   from 1930 – 1945.  After short stints with the Birmingham Black Barons (1930) and Indianapolis ABCs (1931), the 4-time Negro League All-Star had his best years with the Pittsburgh Crawfords (1931 – 1936).  He teamed with “Cool Papa” Bell and Ted Page to give the Crawfords one of the best outfields in the Negro Leagues at that time.  The final years of his career (1941 – 1945) with the Chicago American Giants were interrupted by military service in 1943 – 1944.  After retiring from baseball, Crutchfield worked in the postal service 26 years.

 

Pat Patterson   –   Wiley College

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A standout in football and baseball in college, Patterson played infield with mainly Negro National League (NNL) teams.  He had a 13 season career that began in 1934, interrupted by military service from 1943 – 1945.  The 4-time All-Star had stints with the Homestead Grays, Kansas City Monarchs, Philadelphia Stars, Newark Eagles, and New York Black Yankees.  He also played 2nd base on the 1935 Pittsburgh Crawfords, considered by many one of the best Negro League teams ever assembled.  Patterson became a high school teacher, coach, and school administrator in Houston, Texas.

 

James Buster Clarkson    –   Wilberforce College

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Wherever Clarkson played, he demonstrated an ability to hit a baseball.  First in Negro League baseball with the Pittsburgh/Toledo Crawfords (1938 – 39), Newark Eagles (1940), and Philadelphia Stars (1942), he established the reputation as a hard-hitting shortstop/third baseman.  In 1941, he followed the same script playing in the Mexican League.

After returning from military service (1943 – 1945), Clarkson re-established his reputation in the Negro Leagues (Philadelphia Stars 1946, 1949), in Mexico (1946 – 47) and in the Canadian League (1948).  The Boston Braves signed him in 1950 and he tormented pitchers in the leagues of their minor league system.  On April 30, 1952 with the Braves, at 37 years old, Clarkson became the first from a HBCU to play in the Major Leagues.  Ironically however, he got off to a slow start hitting .200 and played in only 25 games.  Pushed aside in favor of younger white players (Ed Mathews, Johnny Logan, and Jack Cusack), Clarkson went back to the minor leagues where he spent the rest of his career hitting close to .300 with double digits in home runs (42 HRs in Texas League 1954).

 

Joe Black   –   Morgan State Univ.

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Winning all Central Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (CIAA) honors in football and track (hurdler & javelin throw), Black is in Morgan State’s athletic Hall of Fame.  While serving in the military, 1943 – 1945, he became a starter in the Baltimore Elite Giant’s pitching rotation.   The 3-time participant in the Negro League East-West All-Star Game signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1950.  In his first Major League season, Black had a record of 15 – 4 and national baseball writers voted him 1952 National League Rookie of the Year.  On October 1, 1952 Black defeated the New York Yankees to become the first African-American pitcher to win a World Series game.  After retiring from baseball in 1957, he went back to college and received a Masters’ Degree, became a high school teacher, and then worked in an executive position with the Greyhound Corporation.

There are many more that could be added to this short list such as David Malarcher (Dillard/Xavier), Monte Irvin (Lincoln Univ. in Pa.), Bill Foster (Alcorn A & M), and Hilton Smith (Prairie View A & M).

The racism of the times contributed to Bus Clarkson’s short stay in the Major Leagues after Jackie Robinson erased the color line.  However, a number of HBCU products have had excellent Major League baseball careers. Lou Brock (Southern Univ.) and Andre Dawson (Florida A & M) are in the National Baseball Hall of Fame.  Also, George Altman (Tennessee A & I), Ralph Garr (Grambling), Hal McRae (Florida A & M), Danny Goodwin (Southern Univ.), Dennis “Oil Can” Boyd (Jackson State), and others from HBCUs have had well established Major League careers.

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