The Negro League Baseball History Fact For Today – Frank Duncan

In celebration of Black History Month, here is Today’s Negro League Baseball History Fact: Frank Duncan

Frank Duncan spent 20 of his 28 years (1920 – 1948) in Negro League baseball with his hometown Kansas City Monarchs. Born February 14, 1901 in Kansas City, Missouri, he played on both Monarch teams that were Negro League World Series Champions; although almost two decades apart.

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Known mostly for his defense as a catcher, Duncan’s strong throwing arm helped Monarch pitchers hold opposing baserunners close to first or second base. A smart catcher, he worked with Hall of Fame pitchers Jose Mendez, Bullet Rogan, Satchel Paige, and Hilton Smith during his years with the Kansas City team.

He first played with the Monarchs from 1921 -1934. During that time the team won four Negro National League (NNL) pennants (1923 – 1925, 1929).  They defeated the Hilldale Club of Darby, Pennsylvania in the first Negro League World Series (1924).  Duncan got the key hit to drive in two runs and help the Monarchs win Game Seven of the best five out of nine series.

Although the Monarchs continued to operate when the NNL went out of business after the 1931 season, Duncan left to play for teams in New York and Pittsburgh. He returned to the Monarchs in 1937, the first year of the Negro American League (NAL).  The next season he played with the Chicago American Giants, but returned to the Monarch’s in 1940 and became the team’s player/manager.

In 1942, the Monarchs won the NAL pennant and defeated the Homestead Grays in the Negro League World Series; the team’s second World Series championship. Duncan led the team to another NAL pennant in 1946, but it lost a closely contested Negro League World Series to the Newark Eagles.

Duncan and his son Frank, a pitcher, were the first Negro League father-son battery in 1941.

Negro League baseball is not just a part of African-American history, but it is woven into the fabric of 20th Century American history.

.To read more about the Negro League baseball era Last Train To Cooperstown

 

 

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